Closed Programs

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The following programs were administered by the Claims Conference in the past but presently are CLOSED TO NEW APPLICANTS. These pages are for informational purposes only.

Read about the direct compensation programs we currently administer.


Program for Former Slave and Forced Laborers

The Claims Conference Program for Former Slave and Forced Laborers began in 2000, after German government and industry agreed to a DM 10 billion fund to compensate surviving former laborers under the Nazis. The Claims Conference was a major party in the protracted negotiations that led to the agreement. This program is now closed. Read more.


Fund for Victims of Medical Experiments and Other Injuries

In 2005, the Claims Conference concluded payments from the Fund for Victims of Medical Experiments and Other Injuries. The Fund was part of the German Foundation “Remembrance, Responsibility and the Future” and was administered by the Claims Conference for Jewish claimants (aside from those in the Czech Republic, Poland, and the former Soviet Union). This program is now closed. Read more.


Swiss Banks Settlement

In early 2005, the Claims Conference concluded the Swiss Refugee Program, funded by the Refugee Class of the $1.25 billion Swiss Banks Settlement. The Settlement was reached in U.S. District Court in 1998 under Chief Judge Edward R. Korman of the Eastern District of New York. This prgoram is now closed. Read more.


International Commission on Holocaust Era Insurance Claims (ICHEIC)

In 1998, together with U.S. insurance regulators, representatives of the State of Israel and the World Jewish Restitution Organization (WJRO), the Claims Conference was involved in the establishment of the International Commission on Holocaust Era Insurance Claims (ICHEIC) in order to resolve disputes over unpaid insurance policies issued by a number of major European insurance companies to Holocaust victims. ICHEIC was chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger. This program is now closed. Read more.


Budapest Fund

The Budapest Fund, established in 2008 after negotiations with the German government, provided one-time payments of €1900 to certain survivors of the Nazi occupation of Budapest. This program is now closed. Read more.